Evaluating the Effects of Moderate Physical Activity on Health and Well-being in Adolescents and Young Adults With Marfan Syndrome

Status: Recruiting
Location: See location...
Intervention Type: Other
Study Type: Interventional
Study Phase: Not Applicable
SUMMARY

Marfan syndrome (MFS) affects multiple organ systems including the heart, bones, ligaments, and eyes, and is associated with significant risk of aortic dissection. Given limited evidence from in-vitro studies, and theoretical concerns, the majority of patients with MFS are restricted from certain physical activities. The lack of exercise and deconditioning have detrimental effects including increasing weakness, joint pain, decreased endurance, and depressive symptoms. Given the significant paucity of data currently existing on the effects of exercise in humans with MFS, and the recent, optimistic findings in rodent models, this pilot trial was established to assess the effects of moderated dynamic exercise in adolescents and young adults with MFS.

Eligibility
Participation Requirements
Sex: All
Minimum Age: 12
Maximum Age: 21
Healthy Volunteers: No
View:

• Must be between the ages of 12-21

• Diagnosis of Marfan Syndrome

• Must not have other conditions that limit the patients ability to perform exercise

Locations
United States
Texas
Texas Children's Hospital
Recruiting
Houston
Contact Information
Primary
Shaine A Morris, MD, MPH
shainem@bcm.edu
832-826-5692
Backup
Jennifer Bogardus, PT, MPT, PhD
jbogardus@twu.edu
713-794-2070
Time Frame
Start Date: November 9, 2020
Estimated Completion Date: June 30, 2022
Participants
Target number of participants: 20
Treatments
Experimental: Exercise Intervention Group
Group of up to 20 patients will receive all of the preliminary outcome measure testing (cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and psychological screening) in addition to exercise intervention education, demonstration, and follow up to ensure compliance and safety.
Authors
Shaine A Morris
Sponsors
Collaborators: The Marfan Foundation
Leads: Baylor College of Medicine

This content was sourced from clinicaltrials.gov