Effects of Cervical Chiropractic Adjustments on Heart Rate Variability, Quality of Life and Tumor Marker of Colon Cancer Patients

Status: Recruiting
Location: See location...
Intervention Type: Procedure
Study Type: Interventional
Study Phase: Not Applicable
SUMMARY

This preliminary clinical trial will examine the effects of vagal nerve activation via cervical chiropractic adjustments on clinical outcomes in patients with colon cancer. Specifically, hypothesize that participants randomly assigned to receive cervical chiropractic adjustments will have higher heart rate variability (HRV), better health-related quality of life (QOL) and lower levels of both pain and a colon cancer tumor marker, than controls. The aim is to recruit 80 participants with advanced colon cáncer (stage III-IV) who will be measured at baseline for QOL, pain, HRV and a colon cancer marker. Thereafter, they will be randomized to receive a high-velocity low amplitude chiropractic intervention or light touch-based intervention for 10 weeks. Follow up will be at specific intervals across 6 months.

Eligibility
Participation Requirements
Sex: All
Minimum Age: 18
Healthy Volunteers: No
View:

• Diagnosed with stage 3 or stage 4 colon cancer and currently receiving standard of care with a medical doctor.

• Willingness to shave a small area of hair just under the left clavicle.

Locations
United States
Georgia
Dr. Sid E. Williams Center for Chiropractic Research
Recruiting
Atlanta
Contact Information
Primary
Austin Garlinghouse
clinical.studies@life.edu
770-426-2639
Time Frame
Start Date: December 1, 2022
Estimated Completion Date: February 24, 2024
Participants
Target number of participants: 80
Treatments
Experimental: Chiropractic Adjustment
Chiropractic high velocity low amplitude adjustment
Active Comparator: Light touched-based intervention
Light touch with low amplitude low-velocity intervention to back
Related Therapeutic Areas
Sponsors
Collaborators: University of Haifa
Leads: Life University

This content was sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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