Effects of Vitamin D on Skeletal Muscle Strength in Resistance Trained Adult Females

Status: Not yet recruiting
Intervention Type: Dietary Supplement
Study Type: Interventional
Study Phase: Not Applicable
SUMMARY

The majority of vitamin D research has been done in non-athletic populations, particularly older populations, to analyze muscle weakness, pain, balance, and fractures. It has been reported that over a billion people worldwide are vitamin D deficient, including 36-70% of the young adult population. Previous literature also suggests that, even among healthy athletes, over 50% of subjects sampled had inadequate or insufficient vitamin D levels. Vitamin D deficiency can occur in young women, including pregnant women, and the risk of deficiency is even higher with advancing age in a woman's lifecycle. It is known that preserving skeletal muscle (SM) function is critical for women of all ages to prevent sarcopenia. Two factors in preserving SM are protein intake and resistance training. Relatively unknown are the actions of Vitamin D on SM function. Vitamin D deficiency can have a negative effect on SM function . However, additional research is needed to investigate the increase in SM strength when the serum concentration of vitamin D is improved. It is possible that an athlete may require an increased intake of vitamin D to assure adequate availability and storage for optimal performance; however, is known that food sources of vitamin D are limited in sufficient quantity to meet these requirements. Athletes who are insufficient will require a supplement of vitamin D3 for up to 5000 IU/day for at least eight weeks, to potentially reach optimal levels, then 1000-2000 IU/day for maintenance.

Eligibility
Participation Requirements
Sex: Female
Minimum Age: 19
Maximum Age: 55
Healthy Volunteers: Accepts Healthy Volunteers
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• Participant will need to answer yes to the following items:

• female

• not pregnant

• between the ages of 19-55 years old

• a non-smoker

• currently resistance training (i.e., lifting weights) for more than 2 days/week for a minimum of > 24 months

• free of any known overt cardiovascular or metabolic disease

• not an active user of tanning beds

• not consuming now or haven't consumed within the last 6 months, a vitamin D or multivitamin supplement or a form of a supplement with vitamin D added

• not consuming now or haven't consumed within the last 2 months, agents that affect hormones (testosterone boosters, growth hormone boosters, etc.) (does not include birth control/oral contraceptives)

• not allergic to rubbing alcohol

Contact Information
Primary
Nilophar L Zandieh, MS
nlz0005@auburn.edu
9492447504
Backup
Donna O Burnett, PhD
dob0002@auburn.edu
334-844-3429
Time Frame
Start Date: September 1, 2022
Estimated Completion Date: February 1, 2023
Participants
Target number of participants: 40
Treatments
Active Comparator: Treatment Group
Participants in this group will be administered an oral Vitamin D3 supplement; 5,000 IU/ day. The participants will take the supplement themselves, orally, once per day, for 8 weeks.
Placebo Comparator: Control Group
Participants in this group will be administered an oral, soft-gel, lookalike placebo. The participants will take the supplement themselves, orally, once per day, for 8 weeks.
Sponsors
Leads: Auburn University

This content was sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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