Greater Occipital Nerve Block for Migraine Prophylaxis

Status: Completed
Location: See location...
Intervention Type: Drug
Study Type: Interventional
Study Phase: Phase 4
SUMMARY

Migraine is a common neurological condition that can be disabling, particularly if chronic. Greater occipital nerve (GON) block has been utilized for decades for the treatment of migraine in the absence of a single randomized, placebo-controlled trial documenting its effectiveness. Hypothesis: Greater occipital nerve block reduces the frequency of days with moderate or severe headache in patients with episodic or chronic migraine.

Eligibility
Participation Requirements
Sex: All
Minimum Age: 18
Maximum Age: 75
Healthy Volunteers: No
View:

• Subjects meet diagnostic criteria for episodic migraine or chronic migraine according to the International Headache Classification II (ICHD-II)

• Migraine sufferers who experience at least 1 attack per week

• Able to read and understand the requirements of the study, abide by any restrictions, and return for the required examinations

• Able and willing to sign an informed consent statement

• Subjects must be in generally good health as confirmed by medical history, medication review, baseline physical examination, vital signs and clinical laboratory evaluations.

Locations
United States
Arizona
Mayo Clinic
Phoenix
Time Frame
Start Date: June 2009
Completion Date: January 2013
Participants
Target number of participants: 70
Treatments
Experimental: Active Injection
Subjects randomized to this arm will receive 2.5 mL 0.5% bupivicaine plus 0.5 mL 20 mg methylprednisolone injected over the ipsilateral (unilateral headache) or bilateral (bilateral headache) occipital nerve.
Placebo Comparator: Placebo Injection
Subjects randomized to this arm will receive 2.75 mL normal saline plus 0.25 mL 1% lidocaine injected over the ipsilateral (unilateral headache) or bilateral (bilateral headache) occipital nerve.
Related Therapeutic Areas
Sponsors
Leads: Mayo Clinic
Collaborators: National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

This content was sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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