Cocaine use is associated with worse outcomes in patients treated with thoracic endovascular repair for type B aortic dissection.

Journal: Journal Of Vascular Surgery
Published:
Abstract

Objective: To describe and compare the clinical and anatomical characteristics and outcomes of patients with and without known cocaine use who underwent thoracic endovascular repair for type B aortic dissections.

Methods: Between January 2012 and January 2017, 186 patients underwent thoracic endovascular repair for type B aortic dissection at our institution. Clinical data and anatomical characteristics were collected under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Survival, reintervention, complications, and characteristics of dissection were compared between patients with cocaine use (C+; n = 14) and those with no known cocaine use (C-; n = 172).

Results: Cocaine users were more likely to be young African American males who smoked. They tended to present with more extensive dissections as evidenced by larger false lumen diameters. They also had higher rates of endoleaks and more reinterventions.

Conclusions: These results suggest that special care should be taken to provide close follow-up for these patients.

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