Fat Grafting as Regenerative Surgery: A Current Review.

Journal: Plastic And Reconstructive Surgery
Published:
Abstract

Autologous fat grafting has long been regarded an ideal filler, lauded for its ability to restore soft tissue contour. In recent times, fat grafting has exhibited regenerative capacity, largely secondary to the action of adipose-derived stem cells and preadipocytes in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. This has birthed a new field of regenerative surgery with benefits germane to scarring, fibrosis, atrophy, burns, neuropathic pain, autoimmune disease and more. The broad clinical applications of regenerative fat grafting have the potential to improve quality of life through functional and aesthetic improvement. Fat grafting has the potential to serve as a regenerative option for difficult clinical problems that cannot be effectively treated at the present time. Fat grafting also exhibits angiogenic and immunomodulatory properties in the context of autoimmune disease. The broad clinical applications of regenerative fat grafting have the potential to improve quality of life both functionally and aesthetically. It may present a less invasive avenue for clinical issues that today necessitate conventional surgical techniques. However, regenerative fat grafting is still in its infancy; further research is required to ascertain evidence-based protocols for the various clinical indications and better understand the precise regenerative mechanisms after fat grafting.

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Relevant Conditions

Neuralgia

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