Efficacy Analysis of Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery for Small-Volume Spontaneous Thalamic Hemorrhage.

Journal: World Neurosurgery
Treatment Used: Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery
Number of Patients: 84
Published:
MediFind Summary

Summary: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of robot-assisted surgery in patients with small-volume thalamic hemorrhage (i.e. excessive bleeding in the thalamus area of the brain).

Conclusion: Robot-assisted drainage of excessive bleeding in the thalamus area of the brain can improve prognosis and reduce the incidence of pneumonia and kidney dysfunction.

Abstract

Objective: To test whether robot-assisted surgery can improve prognosis of small-volume thalamic hemorrhage and to provide a surgical basis for treatment of small-volume thalamic hemorrhage.

Methods: This retrospective study included patients with thalamic hemorrhage and hematoma volume of 5-15 mL treated from December 2015 to December 2018. Patients were divided into an operation group and a nonoperation group. General data, types of hematoma, incidence of complications, Scandinavian Stroke Scale score, and modified Rankin Scale score were recorded and analyzed.

Results: Retrospectively, 84 cases met inclusion criteria: 35 cases in operation group and 49 cases in nonoperation group. At 90 days after onset, mortality was 11.4% in the operation group and 4.1% in the nonoperation group (P > 0.05). The Scandinavian Stroke Scale score in the operation group (43.3 ± 8.5) was higher than in the nonoperation group (36.1 ± 10.0) (P < 0.05). The modified Rankin Scale score in the operation group (2.9 ± 0.3) was lower than in the nonoperation group (3.7 ± 0.2) (P < 0.05). The incidence of pneumonia (8.6%) and renal dysfunction (14.3%) was lower in the operation group than in the nonoperation group (28.6% and 34.7%, respectively) (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the incidence of central fever (5.7% vs. 12.2%), stress ulcer (11.4% vs. 16.3%), and ion balance disturbance (20.0% vs. 26.5%) (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: Robot-assisted drainage of thalamic hemorrhage can improve prognosis and reduce the incidence of pneumonia and renal dysfunction.

Authors
Yu Wang, Hai Jin, Shun Gong, Xingwang Yang, Xiao Sun, Mengting Xu, Yang Liu, Shimiao Wang, Weilong Song, Yingqun Tao

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