Learn About Ganglioneuroma

What is the definition of Ganglioneuroma?

Ganglioneuroma is a tumor of the autonomic nervous system.

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What are the causes of Ganglioneuroma?

Ganglioneuromas are rare tumors that most often start in autonomic nerve cells. Autonomic nerves manage body functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, sweating, bowel and bladder emptying, and digestion. The tumors are usually noncancerous (benign).

Ganglioneuromas usually occur in people over 10 years of age. They grow slowly, and may release certain chemicals or hormones.

There are no known risk factors. However, the tumors may be associated with some genetic problems, such as neurofibromatosis type 1.

What are the symptoms of Ganglioneuroma?

A ganglioneuroma usually causes no symptoms. The tumor is only discovered when a person is examined or treated for another condition.

Symptoms depend on the location of the tumor and the type of chemicals it releases.

If the tumor is in the chest area (mediastinum), symptoms may include:

  • Breathing difficulty
  • Chest pain
  • Compression of the windpipe (trachea)

If the tumor is lower down in the abdomen in the area called the retroperitoneal space, symptoms may include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Bloating

If the tumor is near the spinal cord, it may cause:

  • Compression of the spinal cord, which leads to pain and loss of strength or feeling in the legs, arms, or both
  • Spine deformity

These tumors may produce certain hormones, which can cause the following symptoms:

  • Diarrhea
  • Enlarged clitoris (women)
  • High blood pressure
  • Increased body hair
  • Sweating
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What are the current treatments for Ganglioneuroma?

Treatment involves surgery to remove the tumor (if it is causing symptoms).

Who are the top Ganglioneuroma Local Doctors?
Elite
Highly rated in
5
conditions

University Of Bristol

Bristol, ENG, GB 

Pramila Ramani is in Bristol, United Kingdom. Ramani is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Ganglioneuroma. They are also highly rated in 5 other conditions, according to our data. Their top areas of expertise are Ganglioneuroma, Neuroblastoma, Embryonal Tumor with Multilayered Rosettes, and Lactate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

Distinguished
Highly rated in
35
conditions
Hematology Oncology

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Physicians

353 E 68th St 
New York, NY 10065

Mark Dickson is a Hematologist Oncology doctor in New York, New York. Dr. Dickson has been practicing medicine for over 19 years and is rated as a Distinguished doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Ganglioneuroma. He is also highly rated in 35 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Liposarcoma, Leiomyosarcoma, and Epithelioid Sarcoma. He is licensed to treat patients in New York. Dr. Dickson is currently accepting new patients.

 
 
 
 
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Distinguished
Highly rated in
30
conditions
Oncology

NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare System

NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center

161 Fort Washington Ave 
New York, NY 10032

Gary Schwartz is an Oncologist in New York, New York. Dr. Schwartz has been practicing medicine for over 39 years and is rated as a Distinguished doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Ganglioneuroma. He is also highly rated in 30 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Leiomyosarcoma, Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Liposarcoma, and Epithelioid Sarcoma. He is licensed to treat patients in New York. Dr. Schwartz is currently accepting new patients.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Ganglioneuroma?

Most ganglioneuromas are noncancerous. The expected outcome is usually good.

A ganglioneuroma may become cancerous and spread to other areas. It may also come back after it is removed.

What are the possible complications of Ganglioneuroma?

If the tumor has been present for a long time and has pressed on the spinal cord or caused other symptoms, surgery to remove the tumor may not reverse the damage. Compression of the spinal cord may result in loss of movement (paralysis), especially if the cause is not detected promptly.

Surgery to remove the tumor may also lead to complications in some cases. In rare cases, problems due to compression may occur even after the tumor is removed.

When should I contact a medical professional for Ganglioneuroma?

Call your health care provider if you or your child has symptoms that may be caused by this type of tumor.

Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system
What are the latest Ganglioneuroma Clinical Trials?
SIOPEN BIOPORTAL, An International Registry Linked to a Virtual Biobank for Patients With Peripheral Neuroblastic Tumours
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Utility of Gallium-68-DOTA-Octreotate PET/CT in the Characterization of Pediatric Neuroendocrine Tumors
What are the Latest Advances for Ganglioneuroma?
Retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma with nodal involvement in an adult patient with human immunodeficiency virus: a case report and review of the literature.
Adrenal ganglioneuromas: a retrospective multicentric study of 104 cases from the COMETE network.
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Outcomes of the endoscopic endonasal approach for tumors in the third ventricle or invading the third ventricle.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date : August 02, 2020
Published By : Amit M. Shelat, DO, FACP, FAAN, Attending Neurologist and Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

Goldblum JR, Folpe AL, Weiss SW. Benign tumors of peripheral nerves. In: Goldblum JR, Folpe AL, Weiss SW, eds. Enzinger and Weiss's Soft Tissue Tumors. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 26.

Kaidar-Person O, Zagar T, Haithcock BE, Weiss J. Diseases of the pleura and mediastinum. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Kastan MB, Doroshow JH, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 70.