Learn About Gastroparesis

What is the definition of Gastroparesis?

Gastroparesis is a condition that reduces the ability of the stomach to empty its contents. It does not involve a blockage (obstruction).

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What are the alternative names for Gastroparesis?

Gastroparesis diabeticorum; Delayed gastric emptying; Diabetes - gastroparesis; Diabetic neuropathy - gastroparesis

What are the causes of Gastroparesis?

The exact cause of gastroparesis is unknown. It may be caused by a disruption of nerve signals to the stomach. The condition is a common complication of diabetes. It can also follow some surgeries.

Risk factors for gastroparesis include:

  • Diabetes
  • Gastrectomy (surgery to remove part of the stomach)
  • Systemic sclerosis
  • Use of medicine that blocks certain nerve signals (anticholinergic medicine)
What are the symptoms of Gastroparesis?

Symptoms may include:

  • Abdominal distention
  • Hypoglycemia (in people with diabetes)
  • Nausea
  • Premature abdominal fullness after meals
  • Weight loss without trying
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
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What are the current treatments for Gastroparesis?

People with diabetes should always control their blood sugar level. Better control of blood sugar level may improve symptoms of gastroparesis. Eating small and more frequent meals and soft foods may also help relieve some symptoms.

Medicines that may help include:

  • Cholinergic drugs, which act on acetylcholine nerve receptors
  • Erythromycin
  • Metoclopramide, a medicine that helps empty the stomach
  • Serotonin antagonist drugs, which act on serotonin receptors

Other treatments may include:

  • Botulinum toxin (Botox) injected into the outlet of the stomach (pylorus)
  • Surgical procedure that creates an opening between the stomach and small intestine to allow food to move through the digestive tract more easily (gastroenterostomy)
Who are the top Gastroparesis Local Doctors?
Elite
Highly rated in
16
conditions
Gastroenterology

University of Florida Health in Jacksonville

UF Health Gastroenterology Emerson

4555 Emerson Street 
Jacksonville, FL 32207

Ron Schey is a Gastroenterologist in Jacksonville, Florida. Dr. Schey has been practicing medicine for over 31 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Gastroparesis. He is also highly rated in 16 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Gastroparesis, Painful Swallowing, Swallowing Difficulty, and Gastric Dysmotility. He is board certified in Gastroenterology and licensed to treat patients in Florida and Pennsylvania. Dr. Schey is currently accepting new patients.

Elite
Highly rated in
25
conditions
Gastroenterology

Temple University Health System

Temple Digestive Disease Center

3401 N Broad St 
Philadelphia, PA 19140

Henry Parkman is a Gastroenterologist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Dr. Parkman has been practicing medicine for over 40 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Gastroparesis. He is also highly rated in 25 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Gastroparesis, Indigestion, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, and Achalasia. He is board certified in Gastroenterology and licensed to treat patients in Pennsylvania. Dr. Parkman is currently accepting new patients.

 
 
 
 
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Elite
Highly rated in
8
conditions
Gastroenterology

UofL Health

UofL Physicians - Digestive & Liver Health

220 Abraham Flexner Way 
Louisville, KY 40202

Thomas Abell is a Gastroenterologist in Louisville, Kentucky. Dr. Abell has been practicing medicine for over 45 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Gastroparesis. He is also highly rated in 8 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Gastroparesis, Gastric Dysmotility, Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome, and Morning Sickness. He is board certified in Gastroenterology and licensed to treat patients in Mississippi and Kentucky. Dr. Abell is currently accepting new patients.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Gastroparesis?

Many treatments seem to provide only temporary benefit.

What are the possible complications of Gastroparesis?

Ongoing nausea and vomiting may cause:

  • Dehydration
  • Electrolyte imbalances
  • Malnutrition

People with diabetes may have serious complications from poor blood sugar control.

When should I contact a medical professional for Gastroparesis?

Changes in your diet may help control symptoms. Contact your health care provider if symptoms continue or if you have new symptoms.

Digestive system
Stomach
What are the latest Gastroparesis Clinical Trials?
Comparison of Gastrointestinal Transit Measurements for the Atmo Capsule With Those of the Gold Standard (SmartPill) in Gastroparesis and Slow Transit Constipation Patients
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Indiana University GI Neuromuscular Pathology Prospective Registry
What are the Latest Advances for Gastroparesis?
Successful repeated gastric peroral endoscopic myotomy (re-G-POEM) in the treatment of postsurgical gastroparesis.
Safety evaluation of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in patients with local advanced gastric cancer after radical resection for prevention of peritoneal metastasis.
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The Short-Term Effects and Tolerability of Low-Viscosity Soluble Fibre on Gastroparesis Patients: A Pilot Clinical Intervention Study.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date : October 27, 2020
Published By : Michael M. Phillips, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

Bircher G, Woodrow G. Gastroenterology and nutrition in chronic kidney disease. In: Feehally J, Floege J, Tonelli M, Johnson RJ, eds. Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 86.

Koch KL. Gastric neuromuscular function and neuromuscular disorders. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 50.