Aggressive Resection of Malignant Paraaortic and Pelvic Tumors Accompanied by Arterial Reconstruction with Synthetic Arterial Graft.

Journal: The American Journal Of Case Reports
Treatment Used: Resection Accompanied by Arterial Reconstruction with Synthetic Arterial Graft
Number of Patients: 7
Published:
MediFind Summary

Summary: This study reports the treatment of malignant paraaortic and/or pelvic tumor (PPT) with resection and orthotopic replacement of the abdominal aorta and/or iliac arteries with synthetic arterial graft (SAG) .

Conclusion: This study concluded that treatment of malignant paraaortic and/or pelvic tumor (PPT) with aggressive resection accompanied by arterial reconstruction with synthetic arterial graft (SAG) is safe and feasible, shows curative potential, and may play a role in multidisciplinary management of malignant PPTs.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Advanced malignancies in the lower abdomen easily invade the retroperitoneal and pelvic space and often metastasize to the paraaortic and pelvic lymph nodes (LNs), resulting in paraaortic and/or pelvic tumor (PPT). CASE REPORT A total of 7 cases of aggressive malignant PPT resection and orthotopic replacement of the abdominal aorta and/or iliac arteries with synthetic arterial graft (SAG) were experienced during 16 years. We present our experience with aggressive resection of malignant PPTs accompanied by arterial reconstruction with SAG in detail. The primary diseases included 2 cases endometrial cancer and 2 cases of rectal cancer, and 1 case each of ovarian carcinosarcoma, vaginal malignant melanoma, and sigmoid cancer. Surgical procedures are described in detail. Briefly, the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries were anastomosed to the SAG by continuous running suture using unabsorbent polypropylene. Five Y-shaped and 2 I-shaped SAGs were used. This en bloc resection actually provided safe surgical margins, and tumor exposures were not pathologically observed in the cut surfaces. Graphical and surgical curability were obtained in all cases in which aggressive malignant PPT resections were performed. The short-term postoperative course of our patients was uneventful. From a vascular perspective, the SAGs remained patent over the long term after surgery, and long-term oncologic outcomes were satisfactory. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, this case series is the first report of aggressive malignant PPT resection accompanied by arterial reconstruction with SAG. This procedure is safe and feasible, shows curative potential, and may play a role in multidisciplinary management of malignant PPTs.

Authors
Ryotaro Tani, Tomohide Hori, Hidekazu Yamamoto, Hideki Harada, Michihiro Yamamoto, Masahiro Yamada, Takefumi Yazawa, Ben Sasaki, Masaki Tani, Asahi Sato, Hikotaro Katsura, Yasuyuki Kamada, Ryuhei Aoyama, Yudai Sasaki, Masazumi Zaima

Similar Latest Advances