What is the definition of Ovarian Overproduction of androgens?

Ovarian overproduction of androgens is a condition in which the ovaries make too much testosterone. This leads to the development of male characteristics in a woman. Androgens from other parts of the body can also cause male characteristics to develop in women.

What are the causes for Ovarian Overproduction of androgens?

In healthy women, the ovaries and adrenal glands produce about 40% to 50% of the body's testosterone. Tumors of the ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can both cause too much androgen production.

Cushing disease is a problem with the pituitary gland that leads to excess amounts of corticosteroids. Corticosteroids cause masculine body changes in women. Tumors in the adrenal glands can also cause too much production of androgens and can lead to male body characteristics in women.

What are the symptoms for Ovarian Overproduction of androgens?

High levels of androgens in a female can cause:

  • Acne
  • Changes in female body shape
  • Decrease in breast size
  • Increase in body hair in a male pattern, such as on the face, chin, and abdomen
  • Lack of menstrual periods (amenorrhea)
  • Oily skin

These changes may also occur:

  • Increase in the size of the clitoris
  • Deepening of the voice
  • Increase in muscle mass
  • Thinning hair and hair loss at the front of the scalp on both sides of the head

What are the current treatments for Ovarian Overproduction of androgens?

Treatment depends on the problem that is causing the increased androgen production. Medicines can be given to decrease hair production in women with excess body hair, or to regulate menstrual cycles. In some cases, surgery may be needed to remove an ovarian or adrenal tumor.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Ovarian Overproduction of androgens?

Treatment success depends on the cause of excess androgen production. If the condition is caused by an ovarian tumor, surgery to remove the tumor may correct the problem. Most ovarian tumors are not cancerous (benign) and will not come back after they have been removed.

In polycystic ovary syndrome, the following measures can reduce symptoms caused by high androgen levels:

  • Careful monitoring
  • Weight loss
  • Dietary changes
  • Medicines
  • Regular vigorous exercise

What are the possible complications for Ovarian Overproduction of androgens?

Infertility and complications during pregnancy may occur.

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome may be at increased risk for:

  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Obesity
  • Uterine cancer

How do I prevent Ovarian Overproduction of androgens?

Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome can reduce their changes of long-term complications by maintaining a normal weight through healthy diet and regular exercise.

Overproductive ovaries
Follicle development

REFERENCES

Bulun SE. Physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: Melmed S, Auchus RJ, Goldfine AB, Koenig RJ, Rosen CJ, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 14th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 17.

Huddleston HG, Quinn M, Gibson M. Polycystic ovary syndrome and hirsutism. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 567.

Lobo RA. Hyperandrogenism and androgen excess: physiology, etiology, differential diagnosis, management. In: Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Lentz GM, Valea FA, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 40.

Rosenfield RL, Barnes RB, Ehrmann DA. Hyperandrogenism, hirsutism, and polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 133.

  • Journal: The American journal of case reports
  • Published —
Ovarian Leydig Cell Tumor: Cause of Virilization in a Postmenopausal Woman.
  • Condition: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
  • Journal: The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
  • Treatment Used: Nevanimibe
  • Number of Patients: 10
  • Published —
The study researched the safety and effectiveness of Nevanimibe in treating congenital adrenal hyperplasia.
Clinical Trial
  • Status: Not yet recruiting
  • Intervention Type: Other
  • Participants: 500
  • Start Date: September 1, 2021
FEmale Metabolic Risk and Androgens: an Irish Longitudinal (FEMAIL) Study
Clinical Trial
  • Status: Recruiting
  • Phase: N/A
  • Intervention Type: Drug
  • Participants: 20
  • Start Date: December 9, 2016
Effect of Spironolactone on Adrenal or Ovarian Androgen Production in Overweight Pubertal Girls With Androgen Excess (CBS006)