Learn About Partial Seizure

What is the definition of Partial Seizure?

All seizures are caused by abnormal electrical disturbances in the brain. Partial (focal) seizures occur when this electrical activity remains in a limited area of the brain. The seizures can sometimes turn into generalized seizures, which affect the whole brain. This is called secondary generalization.

Partial seizures can be divided into:

  • Simple, not affecting awareness or memory
  • Complex, affecting awareness or memory of events before, during, and immediately after the seizure, and affecting behavior
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What are the alternative names for Partial Seizure?

Focal seizure; Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures

What are the causes of Partial Seizure?

Partial seizures are the most common type of seizure in people 1 year and older. In people older than 65 who have blood vessel disease of the brain or brain tumors, partial seizures are very common.

What are the symptoms of Partial Seizure?

People with complex partial seizures may or may not remember any or all of the symptoms or events during the seizure.

Depending on where in the brain the seizure starts, symptoms can include:

  • Abnormal muscle contraction, such as abnormal head or limb movements
  • Staring spells, sometimes with repetitive movements such as picking at clothes or lip smacking
  • Eyes moving from side to side
  • Abnormal sensations, such as numbness, tingling, crawling sensation (like ants crawling on the skin)
  • Hallucinations, seeing, smelling, or sometimes hearing things that are not there
  • Abdominal pain or discomfort
  • Nausea
  • Sweating
  • Flushed face
  • Dilated pupils
  • Rapid heart rate/pulse

Other symptoms may include:

  • Blackout spells, periods of time lost from memory
  • Changes in vision
  • Sensation of déjà vu (feeling like current place and time have been experienced before)
  • Changes in mood or emotion
  • Temporary inability to speak
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What are the current treatments for Partial Seizure?

Treatment for partial focal seizures includes medicines, changes in lifestyle for adults and children, such as activity and diet, and sometimes surgery. Your doctor can tell you more about these options.

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Who are the top Partial Seizure Local Doctors?
Elite
Highly rated in
39
conditions
Neurology
General Surgery

NYU Langone Health

NYU Langone Comprehensive Epilepsy Center

223 E 34th St 
New York, NY 10016

Orrin Devinsky is a Neurologist and a General Surgeon in New York, New York. Dr. Devinsky has been practicing medicine for over 40 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Partial Seizure. He is also highly rated in 39 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Seizures, Epilepsy, Dravet Syndrome, and Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures. He is licensed to treat patients in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Devinsky is currently accepting new patients.

Elite
Highly rated in
31
conditions
Neurology

Jefferson Health

Jefferson University Hospitals

909 Walnut St 
Philadelphia, PA 19107

Michael Sperling is a Neurologist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Dr. Sperling has been practicing medicine for over 44 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Partial Seizure. He is also highly rated in 31 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Seizures, Epilepsy, Partial Seizure, and Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizure. He is licensed to treat patients in Pennsylvania. Dr. Sperling is currently accepting new patients.

 
 
 
 
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Elite
Highly rated in
23
conditions
Neurology

Cleveland Clinic Health System

Cleveland Clinic Main Campus

9500 Euclid Ave 
Cleveland, OH 44195

Lara Jehi is a Neurologist in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Jehi has been practicing medicine for over 23 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Partial Seizure. She is also highly rated in 23 other conditions, according to our data. Her top areas of expertise are Seizures, Epilepsy, Partial Seizure, and Partial Familial Epilepsy. She is licensed to treat patients in Ohio. Dr. Jehi is currently accepting new patients.

What are the latest Partial Seizure Clinical Trials?
Human Epilepsy Genetics--Neuronal Migration Disorders Study
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A Pilot Open-label Clinical Trial Evaluating the ExAblate Model 4000 Type-1 Focused Ultrasound Thalamotomy for the Prevention of Secondary Generalization in Focal Onset Epilepsy
What are the Latest Advances for Partial Seizure?
Safety and efficacy of ganaxolone in patients with CDKL5 deficiency disorder: results from the double-blind phase of a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial.
Surgical Treatments for Epilepsy.
Tired of the same old research?
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Antiseizure Medications for Adults With Epilepsy: A Review.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date : February 04, 2020
Published By : Amit M. Shelat, DO, FACP, FAAN, Attending Neurologist and Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101.

Kanner AM, Ashman E, Gloss D, et al. Practice guideline update summary: efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: treatment of new-onset epilepsy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society. Neurology. 2018;91(2):74-81. PMID: 29898971 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29898971/.

Wiebe S. The epilepsies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 375.