Neural Correlates of Sensory Phenomena in Tourette Syndrome

Status: Recruiting
Location: See location...
Intervention Type: Diagnostic Test
Study Type: Observational
SUMMARY

The most pervasive sensory manifestation of TS is sensory over-responsivity (SOR). SOR is defined as excessive behavioral response to commonplace environmental stimuli. SOR is an integral but poorly understood facet of the TS phenotype, one intertwined with core elements of the disorder and worse QOL. This proposal seeks to clarify the mechanistic bases of SOR in TS. Adults with with TS will be recruited 1) to complete a standardized clinical symptom assessment battery and 2) to undergo electroencephalogram (EEG), autonomic, and audio-visual monitoring during tactile and auditory stimuli paradigms, as well as at rest.

Eligibility
Participation Requirements
Sex: All
Minimum Age: 18
Healthy Volunteers: Accepts Healthy Volunteers
View:

• Diagnosis of Tourette syndrome or other chronic tic disorder

• ≥ 18 years of age

• Ability to complete survey instruments

• English fluency (given that all scales are validated in English)

• ≥ 18 years of age AND age within 5 years of a participant in the TS arm of same biological sex (for purposes of age- and sex-matching)

• Ability to complete survey instruments

• English fluency (given that all scales are validated in English)

Locations
United States
Tennessee
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Recruiting
Nashville
Contact Information
Primary
David A Isaacs, MD
david.a.isaacs@vumc.org
615-875-7394
Backup
Michelle R Eckland, BS
michelle.r.eckland.1@vumc.org
615-875-7394
Time Frame
Start Date: July 20, 2021
Estimated Completion Date: December 2024
Participants
Target number of participants: 50
Treatments
Tourette Syndrome
Adults (>18 years of age) with diagnosis of Tourette syndrome
Healthy Control
Adults who are generally healthy with no known neurologic or psychiatric diagnoses
Sponsors
Leads: Vanderbilt University Medical Center

This content was sourced from clinicaltrials.gov

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