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Ectoine lozenges in the treatment of acute viral pharyngitis: a prospective, active-controlled clinical study.

Treatment Used: Ectoine lozenges versus hyaluronic acid versus hypertonic saline gargle
Number of Patients: 90
MediFind Summary

Overview: This study compared lozenges containing ectoine versus hyaluronic acid versus hypertonic saline gargle for the treatment of acute viral pharyngitis.

Conclusion: Ectoine lozenges significantly relieves symptoms of acute viral pharyngitis and is more effective and tolerable than hyaluronic acid lozenges and hypertonic saline gargle. No patients taking ectoine reported unpleasant sensations while applying their treatment, but almost half of the patients using hyaluronic acid lozenges and saline gargle did.

Abstract

Objective: Acute pharyngitis is an uncomfortable disorder mostly caused by viruses and for which antibiotics are unwarranted. This study compared lozenges containing ectoine, a natural extremolyte, with hyaluronic acid lozenges and hypertonic saline gargle for symptomatic treatment of acute viral pharyngitis.

Methods: This prospective, controlled clinical study, recruited 90 patients with moderate-to-severe pharyngitis symptoms who chose to use either ectoine (n = 35), hyaluronic acid (n = 35), or saline gargle (n = 20). Patients applied their 7-day treatment from the inclusion visit (V1) until the end-of-study visit (V2). Patients' pharyngitis symptoms, general health, general treatment effectiveness and tolerability, and patient compliance were assessed by investigators and patients.

Results: The sum score for three primary symptoms (pain on swallowing, urge to cough, and hoarseness) decreased by 79.5% (ectoine), 72.2% (hyaluronic acid), and 44.8% (saline gargle). Both lozenges were significantly superior to saline gargle (P < 0.05). Regarding general health improvement, ectoine was significantly superior to saline gargle (72.5% vs. 45.2%, P < 0.05), but hyaluronic acid (63.3%) was not. At V2, 65.7% of patients receiving ectoine reported "very good" general health vs. 48.6% of those receiving hyaluronic acid and 20.0% using saline gargle. Ectoine was significantly superior (P < 0.05) to both hyaluronic acid and saline gargle in terms of tolerability and patient compliance. No patients taking ectoine reported unpleasant sensations while applying their treatment, whereas almost half of patients using hyaluronic acid lozenges and saline gargle did.

Conclusions: Treatment with ectoine lozenges significantly relieves moderate-to-severe symptoms of acute viral pharyngitis and is more effective and tolerable than treatments with hyaluronic acid lozenges and hypertonic saline gargle.

Authors
Van-anh Dao, Sabrina Overhagen, Andreas Bilstein, Carina Kolot, Uwe Sonnemann, Ralph Mösges
Relevant Conditions

Viral Pharyngitis

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