Learn About Adenomyosis

What is the definition of Adenomyosis?

Adenomyosis is a thickening of the walls of the uterus. It occurs when endometrial tissue grows into the outer muscular walls of the uterus. Endometrial tissue forms the lining of the uterus.

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What are the alternative names for Adenomyosis?

Endometriosis interna; Adenomyoma; Pelvic pain - adenomyosis

What are the causes of Adenomyosis?

The cause is not known. Sometimes, adenomyosis may cause the uterus to grow in size.

The disease most often occurs in women ages 35 to 50 who have had at least one pregnancy.

What are the symptoms of Adenomyosis?

In many cases, there are no symptoms. When symptoms occur, they can include:

  • Long-term or heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Painful menstrual periods, which gets worse
  • Pelvic pain during intercourse
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What are the current treatments for Adenomyosis?

Most women have some adenomyosis as they get close to menopause. However, only a few will have symptoms. Most women do not need treatment.

Birth control pills and an IUD that has progesterone can help decrease heavy bleeding. Medicines such as ibuprofen or naproxen can also help manage symptoms.

Surgery to remove the uterus (hysterectomy) may be done in women with severe symptoms.

Who are the top Adenomyosis Local Doctors?
Elite
Highly rated in
3
conditions

Université De Paris

Paris, FR 

Mathilde Bourdon is in Paris, France. Bourdon is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Adenomyosis. She is also highly rated in 3 other conditions, according to our data. Her top areas of expertise are Adenomyosis, Endometriosis, Infertility, and Mittelschmerz.

Elite
Highly rated in
7
conditions

Université De Paris

Paris, FR 

Pietro Santulli is in Paris, France. Santulli is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Adenomyosis. He is also highly rated in 7 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Endometriosis, Adenomyosis, Infertility, and Mittelschmerz.

 
 
 
 
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Elite
Highly rated in
3
conditions

University Of Rome Tor Vergata

Rome, IT 

Caterina Exacoustos is in Rome, Italy. Exacoustos is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Adenomyosis. She is also highly rated in 3 other conditions, according to our data. Her top areas of expertise are Adenomyosis, Endometriosis, Menorrhagia, and Hysterectomy.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Adenomyosis?

Symptoms most often go away after menopause. Surgery to remove the uterus often gets you rid of symptoms completely.

When should I contact a medical professional for Adenomyosis?

Call your provider if you develop symptoms of adenomyosis.

What are the latest Adenomyosis Clinical Trials?
Modified Downregulation for Women With Adenomyosis of the Uterus Prior to Frozen-thawed Embryo Transfer.
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A Randomized, Controlled, Multi-Center Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of Actamax™ Adhesion Barrier in Women Undergoing Laparoscopic Abdominopelvic Surgery With a Myomectomy Followed by Second Look Laparoscopy (SLL)
What are the Latest Advances for Adenomyosis?
Ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of adenomyosis: a narrative review.
Microbubble contrast agent SonoVue combined with oxytocin improves the efficiency of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for adenomyosis.
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Uterine Adenomyosis: From Disease Pathogenesis to a New Medical Approach Using GnRH Antagonists.
What are our references for Adenomyosis?

Brown D, Levine D. The uterus. In: Rumack CM, Levine D, eds. Diagnostic ultrasound. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 15.

Bulun SE. Physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: Melmed S, Auchus RJ, Goldfine AB, Koenig RJ, Rosen CJ, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 14th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 17.

Dolan MS, Hill C, Valea FA. Benign gynecologic lesions: vulva, vagina, cervix, uterus, oviduct, ovary, ultrasound imaging of pelvic structures. In: Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Lentz GM, Valea FA, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 18.

Gambone JC. Endometriosis and adenomyosis. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker & Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 25.