Learn About Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery

What is the definition of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?

Anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a heart defect. The left coronary artery (LCA), which carries blood to the heart muscle, begins from the pulmonary artery instead of the aorta.

ALCAPA is present at birth (congenital).

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What are the alternative names for Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?

Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery; ALCAPA; ALCAPA syndrome; Bland-White-Garland syndrome; Congenital heart defect - ALCAPA; Birth defect - ALCAPA

What are the causes of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?

ALCAPA is a problem that occurs when the baby's heart is developing early in the pregnancy. The developing blood vessel to the heart muscle does not attach correctly.

In the normal heart, the LCA originates from the aorta. It supplies oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle on the left side of the heart as well as the mitral valve (the heart valve between the upper and lower chambers of the heart on the left side). The aorta is the major blood vessel that takes oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the rest of the body.

In children with ALCAPA, the LCA originates from the pulmonary artery. The pulmonary artery is the major blood vessel that takes oxygen-poor blood from the heart to the lungs to pick up oxygen.

Anomalous left coronary artery

When this defect occurs, blood that is lacking in oxygen is carried to the heart muscle on the left side of the heart. Therefore, the heart muscle does not get enough oxygen. The tissue begins to die due to lack of oxygen. This can cause a heart attack in the baby.

A condition known as "coronary steal" further damages the heart in babies with ALCAPA. The low blood pressure in the pulmonary artery causes blood from the abnormally connected LCA to flow back toward the pulmonary artery instead of toward the heart muscle. This results in less blood and oxygen to the heart muscle. This problem can also lead to a heart attack in a baby. Coronary steal develops over time in babies with ALCAPA if the condition is not treated early.

What are the symptoms of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?

Symptoms of ALCAPA in an infant include:

  • Crying or sweating during feeding
  • Irritability
  • Pale skin
  • Poor feeding
  • Rapid breathing
  • Symptoms of pain or distress in the baby (often mistaken for colic)

Symptoms can appear within the first 2 months of the baby's life.

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What are the current treatments for Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?

Surgery is needed to correct ALCAPA. Only one surgery is needed in most cases. However, the surgery will depend on the baby's condition and the size of the involved blood vessels.

If the heart muscle supporting the mitral valve is seriously damaged from decreased oxygen, the baby may also need surgery to repair or replace the valve. The mitral valve controls blood flow between the chambers on the left side of the heart.

A heart transplant can be done in case the baby's heart is severely damaged due to lack of oxygen.

Medicines used include:

  • Water pills (diuretics )
  • Drugs that make the heart muscle pump harder (inotropic agents)
  • Drugs that lower the workload on the heart (beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors)
Who are the top Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery Local Doctors?
Elite
Highly rated in
2
conditions

Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy Of Medical Sciences And Peking Union Medical College

Beijing, CN 

Chunrong Wang is in Beijing, China. Wang is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery. They are also highly rated in 2 other conditions, according to our data. Their top areas of expertise are Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery, Congenital Coronary Artery Malformation, and Acute Kidney Failure.

Distinguished
Highly rated in
19
conditions
Cardiology

Willis-Knighton Health System

Pierremont Cardiology

1811 E Bert Kouns Industrial Loop 
Shreveport, LA 71105

Joseph Fredi is a Cardiologist in Shreveport, Louisiana. Dr. Fredi has been practicing medicine for over 39 years and is rated as a Distinguished doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery. He is also highly rated in 19 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery, Congenital Coronary Artery Malformation, Coronary Artery Aneurysm, and Coronary Artery Fistula. He is licensed to treat patients in Louisiana and Tennessee. Dr. Fredi is currently accepting new patients.

 
 
 
 
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Distinguished
Highly rated in
5
conditions

Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy Of Medical Sciences And Peking Union Medical College

Beijing, CN 

Fuxia Yan is in Beijing, China. Yan is rated as a Distinguished expert by MediFind in the treatment of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery. They are also highly rated in 5 other conditions, according to our data. Their top areas of expertise are Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery, Subpulmonary Stenosis, Ventricular Septal Defects, and Congenital Heart Disease.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?

Without treatment, most babies do not survive their first year. Children who do survive without treatment may have serious heart problems. Babies with this problem who aren't treated could die suddenly during the following years.

With early treatment such as surgery, most babies do well and can expect a normal life. Routine follow-ups with a heart specialist (cardiologist) will be needed.

What are the possible complications of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?

Complications of ALCAPA include:

  • Heart attack
  • Heart failure
  • Heart rhythm problems
  • Permanent damage to the heart
When should I contact a medical professional for Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?

Call your provider if your baby:

  • Is breathing rapidly
  • Looks very pale
  • Seems distressed and cries often
What are the latest Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery Clinical Trials?
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What are the Latest Advances for Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery?
Stent Angioplasty for Post-Operative Coronary Artery Stenosis in Infants.
Current Strategies for the Management of Anomalous Origin of Coronary Arteries from the Pulmonary Artery.
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Diagnosis and Surgical Outcomes of Patients with Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery: A Single Taiwanese Medical Center Experience.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date : July 07, 2020
Published By : Thomas S. Metkus, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

Brothers JA, Frommelt MA, Jaquiss RDB, Myerburg RJ, Fraser CD Jr, Tweddell JS. Expert consensus guidelines: anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2017;153(6):1440-1457. PMID: 28274557 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28274557/.

Brothers JA, Gaynor JW. Surgery for congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries. In: Sellke FW, del Nido PJ, Swanson SJ, eds. Sabiston and Spencer Surgery of the Chest. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 124.

Johnson JT, Harris M, Anderson RH, Spicer DE, Jacobs M, Tweddll JS, et al. Congenital coronary anomalies. In: Wernovsky G, Anderson RH, Kumar K, et al. Anderson's Pediatric Cardiology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 46.

Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM. Other congenital heart and vascular malformations. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 459.