Learn About Blood Clots

What is the definition of Blood Clots?

Blood clots are clumps that occur when blood hardens from a liquid to a solid.

  • A blood clot that forms inside one of your veins or arteries is called a thrombus. A thrombus may also form in your heart.
  • A thrombus that breaks loose and travels from one location in the body to another is called an embolus.

A thrombus or embolus can partly or completely block the flow of blood in a blood vessel.

  • A blockage in an artery may prevent oxygen from reaching the tissues in that area. This is called ischemia. If ischemia is not treated promptly, it can lead to tissue damage or death.
  • A blockage in the vein will often cause fluid buildup and swelling.
Save information for later
Sign Up
What are the alternative names for Blood Clots?

Clot; Emboli; Thrombi; Thromboembolus; Hypercoagulable state

What are the causes of Blood Clots?

Situations in which a blood clot is more likely to form in veins include:

  • Being on long-term bed rest
  • Sitting for long periods, such as in a plane or car
  • During and after pregnancy
  • Taking birth control pills or estrogen hormones (especially in women who smoke)
  • Long-term use of an intravenous catheter
  • After surgery

Blood clots are also more likely to form after an injury. People with cancer, obesity, and liver or kidney disease are also prone to blood clots.

Smoking also increases the risk of forming blood clots.

Conditions that are passed down through families (inherited) may make you more likely to form abnormal blood clots. Inherited conditions that affect clotting are:

  • Factor V Leiden mutation
  • Prothrombin G20210A mutation

Other rare conditions, such as protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III deficiencies.

A blood clot may block an artery or vein in an organ, affecting the:

  • Heart (angina or a heart attack)
  • Intestines (mesenteric ischemia or mesenteric venous thrombosis)
  • Kidneys (renal vein thrombosis)
  • Leg or arm arteries
  • Legs (deep vein thrombosis)
  • Lungs (pulmonary embolism)
  • Neck or brain (stroke)
Thrombus
Deep venous thrombosis - iliofemoral
Who are the top Blood Clots Local Doctors?
Elite
Elite
 
 
 
 
Learn about our expert tiers
Learn more
Elite
What are the latest Blood Clots Clinical Trials?
Observational Study Evaluating Effectiveness and Safety of Real-World Treatment With Damoctocog Alfa Pegol in Previously Treated Patients With Hemophilia A

Summary: The aim of the HEM-POWR study is to understand better how Damoctocog alfa pegol (Jivi) is used to treat people with Hemophilia A in day-to-day life, how well the treatment is tolerated and how satisfied patients and physicians are with the treatment.

Match to trials
Find the right clinical trials for you in under a minute
Get started
A Multicenter, Open-Label Study to Evaluate the Safety, Efficacy, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Emicizumab in Patients With Mild or Moderate Hemophilia A Without FVIII Inhibitors

Summary: This is a multicenter, open-label, single-arm study designed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of emicizumab in participants with mild or moderate hemophilia A without inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII).

What are the Latest Advances for Blood Clots?
A chronic EBV infection causing persistent facial erythema multiforme and a retrospective literature review: A case report.
Efficacy and quality of life of Romiplostim in adults and children with immune thrombocytopenia: A review.
Tired of the same old research?
Check Latest Advances
Recombinant ADAMTS13 for Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date: April 29, 2022
Published By: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David C. Dugdale, MD, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

Anderson JA, Hogg KE, Weitz JI. Hypercoagulable states. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 140.

Cross SS. Ischaemia, infarction and shock . In: Cross SS, ed. Underwood's Pathology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 7.

Schafer AI. Approach to the patient with bleeding and thrombosis: hypercoagulable states. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 162.