Learn About Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

What is the definition of Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome?

Congenital myasthenic syndrome is a group of conditions characterized by muscle weakness (myasthenia) that worsens with physical exertion. The muscle weakness typically begins in early childhood but can also appear in adolescence or adulthood. Facial muscles, including muscles that control the eyelids, muscles that move the eyes, and muscles used for chewing and swallowing, are most commonly affected. However, any of the muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles) can be affected in this condition. Due to muscle weakness, affected infants may have feeding difficulties. Development of motor skills such as crawling or walking may be delayed. The severity of the myasthenia varies greatly, with some people experiencing minor weakness and others having such severe weakness that they are unable to walk.

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What are the causes of Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome?

Mutations in many genes can cause congenital myasthenic syndrome. Mutations in the CHRNE gene are responsible for more than half of all cases. A large number of cases are also caused by mutations in the RAPSN, CHAT, COLQ, and DOK7 genes. All of these genes provide instructions for producing proteins that are involved in the normal function of the neuromuscular junction. The neuromuscular junction is the area between the ends of nerve cells and muscle cells where signals are relayed to trigger muscle movement.

How prevalent is Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome?

The prevalence of congenital myasthenic syndrome is unknown. At least 600 families with affected individuals have been described in the scientific literature.

Is Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome an inherited disorder?

This condition is most commonly inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, which means both copies of the gene in each cell have mutations. The parents of an individual with an autosomal recessive condition each carry one copy of the mutated gene, but they typically do not show signs and symptoms of the condition.

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What are the latest Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome Clinical Trials?
Congenital Muscle Disease Patient and Proxy Reported Outcome Study

Summary: The Congenital Muscle Disease Patient and Proxy Reported Outcome Study (CMDPROS) is a longitudinal 10 year study to identify and trend care parameters, adverse events in the congenital muscle diseases using the Congenital Muscle Disease International Registry (CMDIR) to acquire necessary data for adverse event calculations (intake survey and medical records curation). To support this study and bec...

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High-Dose Immunosuppressive Therapy Using Carmustine, Etoposide, Cytarabine, and Melphalan (BEAM) + Thymoglobulin Followed by Syngeneic or Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients With Autoimmune Neurologic Diseases

Summary: This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan together with antithymocyte globulin before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with autoimmune neurologic disease that did not respond to previous therapy. In autoimmune neurological diseases, the patient's own immune system 'attacks' the nervous system which mi...

Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date: November 01, 2011Published By: National Institutes of Health

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