Learn About Episodic Ataxia with Nystagmus

What is the definition of Episodic Ataxia with Nystagmus?
Episodic ataxia (EA) with nystagmus is a subtype of conditions that affect the nervous system that cause movement problems and involuntary, rapid, repetitive eye movements, among other symptoms.
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What are the symptoms of Episodic Ataxia with Nystagmus?
Symptoms of episodic ataxia with nystagmus include poor coordination and balance, involuntary, rapid, repetitive eye movements, dizziness, vertigo, nausea and vomiting, migraine headaches, blurred or double vision, slurred speech, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), seizures, muscle weakness, paralysis on one side of the body (hemiplegia), and muscle cramping or twitching.
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What are the current treatments for Episodic Ataxia with Nystagmus?
Treatment for episodic ataxia with nystagmus involves the administration of anti-seizure medications, such as acetazolamide, carbamazepine, valproic acid, flunarizine, and dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine). Amifampridine (3,4-diaminopyridine) may be used to treat nystagmus. Other treatments for episodic ataxia with nystagmus may include physical therapy and diet and lifestyle changes.
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What are the latest Episodic Ataxia with Nystagmus Clinical Trials?
Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford

Summary: CoRDS, or the Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford, is based at Sanford Research in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. It provides researchers with a centralized, international patient registry for all rare diseases. This program allows patients and researchers to connect as easily as possible to help advance treatments and cures for rare diseases. The CoRDS team works with patient advocacy groups, in...

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What are the Latest Advances for Episodic Ataxia with Nystagmus?

There is no recent research available for this condition. Please check back because thousands of new papers are published every week and we strive to find and display the most recent relevant research as soon as it is available.