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Condition

Mesenteric Artery Ischemia

Symptoms, Doctors, Treatments, Research & More

Condition 101

What is the definition of Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

Mesenteric artery ischemia occurs when there is a narrowing or blockage of one or more of the three major arteries that supply the small and large intestines. These are called the mesenteric arteries.

What are the alternative names for Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

Mesenteric vascular disease; Ischemic colitis; Ischemic bowel - mesenteric; Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery

What are the causes for Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta. The aorta is the main artery from the heart.

Hardening of the arteries occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls of arteries. This is more common in smokers and in people with high blood pressure or high blood cholesterol.

This narrows the blood vessels and reduces blood flow to the intestines. Like every other part of the body, blood brings oxygen to the intestines. When the oxygen supply is slowed, symptoms may occur.

The blood supply to the intestines may be suddenly blocked by a blood clot (embolus). The clots most often come from the heart or aorta. These clots are more commonly seen in people with abnormal heart rhythm.

What are the symptoms for Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

Symptoms caused by gradual hardening of the mesenteric arteries include:

  • Abdominal pain after eating
  • Diarrhea

Symptoms of sudden (acute) mesenteric artery ischemia due to a traveling blood clot include:

  • Sudden severe abdominal pain or bloating
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Fever
  • Nausea

What are the current treatments for Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

When blood supply is blocked to a part of the heart muscle, the muscle will die. This is called a heart attack. A similar type of injury can occur to any part of the intestines.

When the blood supply is suddenly cut off by a blood clot, it is an emergency. Treatment can include medicines to dissolve the blood clots and open up the arteries.

If you have symptoms due to hardening of the mesenteric arteries, there are things you can do to control the problem:

  • Stop smoking. Smoking narrows the arteries. This decreases the ability of the blood to carry oxygen and increases the risk of forming clots (thrombi and emboli).
  • Make sure your blood pressure is under control.
  • If you are overweight, reduce your weight.
  • If your cholesterol is high, eat a low-cholesterol and low-fat diet.
  • Monitor your blood sugar level if you have diabetes, and keep it under control.

Surgery may be done if the problem is severe.

  • The blockage is removed and the arteries are reconnected to the aorta. A bypass around the blockage is another procedure. It is usually done with a plastic tube graft.
  • Insertion of a stent. A stent may be used as an alternative to surgery to enlarge the blockage in the artery or to deliver medicine directly to the affected area. This is a new technique and it should only be done by experienced health care providers. The outcome is usually better with surgery.
  • At times, a portion of your intestine will need to be removed.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

The outlook for chronic mesenteric ischemia is good after a successful surgery. However, it is important to make lifestyle changes to prevent hardening of the arteries from getting worse.

People with hardening of the arteries that supply the intestines often have the same problems in blood vessels that supply the heart, brain, kidneys, or legs.

People with acute mesenteric ischemia often do poorly because parts of the intestine may die before surgery can be done. This can be fatal. However, with prompt diagnosis and treatment, acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated successfully.

What are the possible complications for Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

Tissue death from lack of blood flow (infarction) in the intestines is the most serious complication of mesenteric artery ischemia. Surgery may be needed to remove the dead portion.

When should I contact a medical professional for Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

Call your provider if you have:

  • Changes in bowel habits
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Vomiting

How do I prevent Mesenteric Artery Ischemia?

The following lifestyle changes can reduce your risk for narrowing of the arteries:

  • Get regular exercise.
  • Follow a healthy diet.
  • Get heart rhythm problems treated.
  • Keep your blood cholesterol and blood sugar under control.
  • Quit smoking.
Mesenteric

REFERENCES

Holscher CM, Reifsnyder T. Acute mesenteric ischemia. In: Cameron AM, Cameron JL, eds. Current Surgical Therapy. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:1057-1061.

Kahi CJ. Vascular diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 134.

Lo RC, Schermerhorn ML. Mesenteric arterial disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical evaluation. In: Sidawy AN, Perler BA, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 131.

Latest Research

Latest Advance
Study
  • Condition: Post- Extended Left Colectomy or Subtotal Colectomy
  • Journal: Medicine
  • Treatment Used: Single-Port Laparoscopic (SPL) Deloyers Procedure for Tension-Free Anastomosis
  • Number of Patients: 6
  • Published —
This study reported experience with single-port laparoscopic (SPL) Deloyers procedures after subtotal colectomy or extended left hemicolectomy.
Latest Advance
Study
  • Condition: Ischemic Colitis IC)
  • Journal: World journal of emergency surgery : WJES
  • Treatment Used: Emergency Open Colectomy
  • Number of Patients: 94
  • Published —
This study identified predictors of postoperative mortality after emergent open colectomy for ischemic colitis (bowel inflammation due to reduced blood flow).

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trial
Other
  • Status: Recruiting
  • Study Type: Other
  • Participants: 170
  • Start Date: January 14, 2019
Incidence of Neutropenic Enterocolitis Study in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients During Intensive Therapy (DECLAM).