Learn About Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

What is the definition of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type I is a disease in which one or more of the endocrine glands are overactive or forms a tumor. It is passed down through families.

Endocrine glands most commonly involved include:

  • Pancreas
  • Parathyroid
  • Pituitary
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What are the alternative names for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

Wermer syndrome; MEN I

What are the causes of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

MEN I is caused by a defect in a gene that carries the code for a protein called menin. The condition causes tumors of various glands to appear in the same person, but not necessarily at the same time.

The disorder may occur at any age, and it affects men and women equally. A family history of this disorder raises your risk.

What are the symptoms of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

Symptoms vary from person to person, and depend on which gland is involved. They may include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Anxiety
  • Black, tarry stools
  • Bloated feeling after meals
  • Burning, aching, or hunger discomfort in the upper abdomen or lower chest that is relieved by antacids, milk, or food
  • Decreased sexual interest
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Lack of menstrual periods (in women)
  • Loss of appetite
  • Loss of body or facial hair (in men)
  • Mental changes or confusion
  • Muscle pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sensitivity to the cold
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Vision problems
  • Weakness
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What are the current treatments for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

Surgery to remove the diseased gland is often the treatment of choice. A medicine called bromocriptine may be used instead of surgery for pituitary tumors that release the hormone prolactin.

The parathyroid glands, which control calcium production, can be removed. However, it is difficult for the body to regulate calcium levels without these glands, so a total parathyroid removal is not done first in most cases.

Medicine is available to decrease the excess stomach acid production caused by some tumors (gastrinomas), and to reduce the risk of ulcers.

Hormone replacement therapy is given when entire glands are removed or do not produce enough hormones.

Who are the top Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Local Doctors?
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Highly rated in
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Endocrinology
Hospital Medicine

Johns Hopkins Health System

National Institutes Of Health Clinical Center

10 Center Dr 
Bethesda, MD 20892

William Simonds is an Endocrinologist and a Hospital Medicine doctor in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Simonds has been practicing medicine for over 41 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1. He is also highly rated in 14 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia, Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1, Parathyroid Cancer, and Parathyroid Adenoma. He is licensed to treat patients in Maryland. Dr. Simonds is currently accepting new patients.

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Highly rated in
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University Of Oxford

Academic Endocrine Unit, Radcliffe Department Of Medicine, Endocrinology And Metabolism, Churchill Hospital 
Churchill, ENG, GB 

Rajesh Thakker is in Churchill, United Kingdom. Thakker is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1. He is also highly rated in 38 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia, Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1, Milk-Alkali Syndrome, and Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia.

 
 
 
 
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Highly rated in
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University Of Oxford

Academic Endocrine Unit, Radcliffe Department Of Medicine, Endocrinology And Metabolism, Churchill Hospital 
Churchill, ENG, GB 

Kate Lines is in Churchill, United Kingdom. Lines is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1. She is also highly rated in 11 other conditions, according to our data. Her top areas of expertise are Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1, Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia, Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor, and Neuroendocrine Tumor.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

Pituitary and parathyroid tumors are usually noncancerous (benign), but some pancreatic tumors may become cancerous (malignant) and spread to the liver. These can lower life expectancy.

The symptoms of peptic ulcer disease, low blood sugar, excess calcium in the blood, and pituitary dysfunction usually respond well to appropriate treatment.

What are the possible complications of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

The tumors can keep coming back. Symptoms and complications depend on which glands are involved. Regular check-ups by your provider are essential.

When should I contact a medical professional for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

Call your provider if you notice symptoms of MEN I or have a family history of this condition.

How do I prevent Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?

Screening close relatives of people affected with this disorder is recommended.

Endocrine glands
What are the latest Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Clinical Trials?
Metabolomics and Genetic Diagnosing Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Patients
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Study and Follow-up of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1
What are the Latest Advances for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1?
Adult Proinsulinomatosis Associated With a MAFA Germline Mutation as a Rare Cause of Recurrent Hypoglycemia.
A case report of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and autoimmune disease: Coincidence or correlation?
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Tumor Syndromes: Neurosurgical Evaluation and Management.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date : February 06, 2020
Published By : Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

National Comprehensive Cancer Network website. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology (NCCN guideines): neuroendocrine tumors. Version 1.2019. www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/neuroendocrine.pdf. Updated March 5, 2019. Accessed March 8, 2020.

Newey PJ, Thakker RV. Multiple endocrine neoplasia. In: Melmed S, Auchus RJ, Goldfine AB, Koenig RJ, Rosen CJ, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 14th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 42.

Nieman LK, Spiegel AM. Polyglandular disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 218.

Thakker RV. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 148.