Condition 101 About Potter Syndrome

What is the definition of Potter Syndrome?

Potter syndrome and Potter phenotype refers to a group of findings associated with a lack of amniotic fluid and kidney failure in an unborn infant.

What are the alternative names for Potter Syndrome?

Potter phenotype

What are the causes for Potter Syndrome?

In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is growing in the womb. The kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine).

Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that occurs in a newborn when there is no amniotic fluid. The lack of amniotic fluid is called oligohydramnios. Without amniotic fluid, the infant is not cushioned from the walls of the uterus. The pressure of the uterine wall leads to an unusual facial appearance, including widely separated eyes.

Potter phenotype may also lead to abnormal limbs, or limbs that are held in abnormal positions or contractures.

Oligohydramnios also stops development of the lungs, so the lungs do not work properly at birth.

What are the symptoms for Potter Syndrome?

Symptoms include:

  • Widely separated eyes with epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, low set ears, and receding chin
  • Absence of urine output
  • Difficulty breathing

What are the current treatments for Potter Syndrome?

Resuscitation at delivery may be attempted pending the diagnosis. Treatment will be provided for any urinary outlet obstruction.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Potter Syndrome?

This is a very serious condition. Most of the time it is deadly. The short-term outcome depends on the severity of lung involvement. Long-term outcome depends on the severity of kidney involvement.

How do I prevent Potter Syndrome?

There is no known prevention.

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REFERENCES

Joyce E, Ellis D, Miyashita Y. Nephrology. In: Zitelli BJ, McIntire SC, Nowalk AJ, eds. Zitelli and Davis' Atlas of Pediatric Physical Diagnosis. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 14.

Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM. Congenital and developmental abnormalities of the urinary tract. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 168.

Mitchell AL. Congenital anomalies. In: Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 30.

Top Global Doctors For Potter Syndrome

Latest Advances On Potter Syndrome

  • Condition: Giant Pleural Tumor and Severe Hypoglycemia
  • Journal: Revista portuguesa de cirurgia cardio-toracica e vascular : orgao oficial da Sociedade Portuguesa de Cirurgia Cardio-Toracica e Vascular
  • Treatment Used: Complete Surgical Resection
  • Number of Patients: 1
  • Published —
This case report describes a patient with giant pleural tumor and severe hypoglycemia.
  • Condition: Doege-Potter Syndrome
  • Journal: Rozhledy v chirurgii : mesicnik Ceskoslovenske chirurgicke spolecnosti
  • Treatment Used: Radical En Bloc Tumor Resection
  • Number of Patients: 1
  • Published —
This case report describes a patient with recurrent hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) caused solely by solitary fibrous tumor treated with radical en-bloc tumor resection.

Clinical Trials For Potter Syndrome

There are no recent clinical trials available for this condition. Please check back because new trials are being conducted frequently.