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Condition

Torticollis

Symptoms, Doctors, Treatments, Research & More

Condition 101

What is the definition of Torticollis?

Torticollis is a condition in which the neck muscles cause the head to turn or rotate to the side.

What are the alternative names for Torticollis?

Spasmodic torticollis; Wry neck; Loxia; Cervical dystonia; Cock-robin deformity; Twisted neck; Grisel syndrome

What are the causes for Torticollis?

Torticollis may be:

  • Due to changes in genes, often passed down in the family
  • Due to problems in the nervous system, upper spine, or muscles

The condition may also occur without a known cause.

With torticollis present at birth, it may occur if:

  • The baby's head was in the wrong position while growing in the womb
  • The muscles or blood supply to the neck were injured

What are the symptoms for Torticollis?

Symptoms of torticollis include:

  • Limited movement of the head
  • Headache
  • Head tremor
  • Neck pain
  • Shoulder that is higher than the other
  • Stiffness of the neck muscles
  • Swelling of the neck muscles (possibly present at birth)

What are the current treatments for Torticollis?

Treating torticollis that is present at birth involves stretching the shortened neck muscle. Passive stretching and positioning are used in infants and small children. In passive stretching, a device such as strap, a person, or something else is used to hold the body part in a certain position. These treatments are often successful, especially if they are started within 3 months of birth.

Surgery to correct the neck muscle may be done in the preschool years, if other treatment methods fail.

Torticollis that is caused by damage to the nervous system, spine, or muscles is treated by finding the cause of the disorder and treating it. Depending on the cause, treatment may include:

  • Physical therapy (applying heat, traction to the neck, and massage to help relieve head and neck pain).
  • Stretching exercises and neck braces to help with muscle spasms.
  • Taking medicines such as baclofen to reduce neck muscle contractions.
  • Injecting botulinum.
  • Trigger point injections to relieve pain at a particular point.
  • Surgery of the spine might be needed when the torticollis is due to dislocated vertebrae. In some cases, surgery involves destroying some of the nerves in the neck muscles, or using brain stimulation.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Torticollis?

The condition may be easier to treat in infants and children. If torticollis becomes chronic, numbness and tingling may develop due to pressure on the nerve roots in the neck.

What are the possible complications for Torticollis?

Complications in children may include:

  • Flat head syndrome
  • Deformity of the face due to lack of sternomastoid muscle movement

Complications in adults may include:

  • Muscle swelling due to constant tension
  • Nervous system symptoms due to pressure on nerve roots

When should I contact a medical professional for Torticollis?

Call for an appointment with your provider if symptoms do not improve with treatment, or if new symptoms develop.

Torticollis that occurs after an injury or with illness may be serious. Seek medical help right away if this occurs.

How do I prevent Torticollis?

While there is no known way to prevent this condition, early treatment may prevent it from getting worse.

Torticollis

REFERENCES

Krauss JK. Selective peripheral denervation for cervical dystonia. In: Winn HR, ed. Youmans and Winn Neurological Surgery. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 96.

Marcdante KJ, Kleigman RM. Spine. In: Marcdante KJ, Kleigman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 202.

White KK, Bouchard M, Goldberg MJ. Common neonatal orthopedic conditions. In: Gleason CA, Juul SE, eds. Avery's Diseases of the Newborn. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 101.

Latest Research

Latest Advance
Study
  • Condition: Primary Dystonia
  • Journal: Journal of neurophysiology
  • Treatment Used: Deep Brain Stimulation
  • Number of Patients: 7
  • Published —
This study evaluated deep brain stimulation changes for upper limb cortical motor maps in dystonia (movement disorder).
Latest Advance
Study
  • Condition: Developmental Dysplasia
  • Journal: BMC pediatrics
  • Treatment Used: Tubingen Hip Flexion Splints
  • Number of Patients: 195
  • Published —
This study tested the safety and efficacy of using Tubingen hip flexion splints to treat patients with developmental dysplasia.

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trial
Behavioral
  • Status: Not yet recruiting
  • Study Type: Behavioral
  • Participants: 264
  • Start Date: April 1, 2021
Interventions for Convergence Insufficiency in Concussed Children (ICONICC)
Clinical Trial
Device
  • Status: Not yet recruiting
  • Study Type: Device
  • Participants: 50
  • Start Date: November 1, 2020
Technology-based Analysis of Movement Disorders