Learn About Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return

What is the definition of Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

Total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a heart disease in which the 4 veins that take blood from the lungs to the heart do not attach normally to the left atrium (left upper chamber of the heart). Instead, they attach to another blood vessel or the wrong part of the heart. It is present at birth (congenital heart disease).

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What are the alternative names for Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

TAPVR; Total veins; Congenital heart defect - TAPVR; Cyanotic heart disease - TAPVR

What are the causes of Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

The cause of total anomalous pulmonary venous return is unknown.

In normal circulation, blood is sent from the right ventricle to pick up oxygen in the lungs. It then returns through the pulmonary (lung) veins to the left side of the heart, which sends blood out through the aorta and around the body.

In TAPVR, oxygen-rich blood returns from the lungs to the right atrium or to a vein flowing into the right atrium, instead of the left side of heart. In other words, blood simply circles to and from the lungs and never gets out to the body.

For the infant to live, an atrial septal defect (ASD) or patent foramen ovale (passage between the left and right atria) must exist to allow oxygenated blood to flow to the left side of the heart and the rest of the body.

How severe this condition is depends on whether the pulmonary veins are blocked or obstructed as they drain. Obstructed TAPVR causes symptoms early in life and can be deadly very quickly if it is not found and corrected with surgery.

What are the symptoms of Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

The infant may appear very sick and may have the following symptoms:

  • Bluish color of the skin (cyanosis)
  • Frequent respiratory infections
  • Lethargy
  • Poor feeding
  • Poor growth
  • Rapid breathing

Note: Sometimes, no symptoms may be present in infancy or early childhood.

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What are the current treatments for Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

Surgery to repair the problem is needed as soon as possible. In surgery, the pulmonary veins are connected to the left atrium and the defect between the right and left atrium is closed.

Who are the top Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return Local Doctors?
Elite
Highly rated in
41
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Ansari Nagar

New Delhi, DL, IN 

Sachin Talwar is in New Delhi, India. Talwar is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return. He is also highly rated in 41 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Transposition of the Great Arteries, Ventricular Septal Defects, Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return, and Tetralogy of Fallot.

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Highly rated in
7
conditions

University Of Melbourne

Department Of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Townsville University Hospital 
Townsville, QLD, AU 

Matthew Yong is in Townsville, Australia. Yong is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return. He is also highly rated in 7 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return, Congenital Tracheomalacia, Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease, and Heart Tumor.

 
 
 
 
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Elite
Highly rated in
16
conditions

University Of Padua

Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Unit, Thoracic, Vascular Sciences 
Padova, IT 

Vladimiro Vida is in Padova, Italy. Vida is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return. They are also highly rated in 16 other conditions, according to our data. Their top areas of expertise are Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return, Congenital Heart Disease CHD, Tetralogy of Fallot, and Congenital Coronary Artery Malformation.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

If this condition is not treated, the heart will get larger, leading to heart failure. Repairing the defect early provides excellent results if there is no blockage of the pulmonary veins at the new connection into the heart. Infants who have obstructed veins have worsened survival.

What are the possible complications of Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

Complications may include:

  • Breathing difficulties
  • Heart failure
  • Irregular, fast heart rhythms (arrhythmias)
  • Lung infections
  • Pulmonary hypertension
When should I contact a medical professional for Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

This condition may be apparent at the time of birth. However, symptoms may not be present until later.

Call your health care provider if you notice symptoms of TAPVR. Prompt attention is required.

How do I prevent Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?

There is no known way to prevent TAPVR.

Heart - section through the middle
Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray
Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray
Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray
What are the latest Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return Clinical Trials?
Targeting Normoxia in Neonates With Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease in the Intra-operative and Immediate Post-operative Period (T-NOX)
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What are the Latest Advances for Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return?
Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome in a postoperative patient: a case report.
Treatment and prognosis of 826 infants with critical congenital heart disease: a single center retrospective study.
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Emergency surgery without stabilization prior to surgical repair for total anomalous pulmonary venous connection reduces duration of mechanical ventilation without reducing survival.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date: October 10, 2021
Published By: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

Valente AM, Dorfman AL, Babu-Narayan SV, Kreiger EV. Congenital heart disease in the adolescent and adult. In: Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Tomaselli GF, Bhatt DL, Solomon SD, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2022:chap 82.

Well A, Fraser CD. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2022:chap 59.