Learn About Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

What is the definition of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a condition in which the body produces too much of the hormone gastrin. Most of the time, a small tumor (gastrinoma) in the pancreas or small intestine is the source of the extra gastrin in the blood.

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What are the alternative names for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Z-E syndrome; Gastrinoma

What are the causes of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is caused by tumors. These growths are most often found in the head of the pancreas and the upper small intestine. The tumors are called gastrinomas. High levels of gastrin cause production of too much stomach acid.

Gastrinomas occur as single tumors or several tumors. One half to two thirds of single gastrinomas are cancerous (malignant) tumors. These tumors often spread to the liver and nearby lymph nodes.

Many people with gastrinomas have several tumors as part of a condition called multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN I). Tumors may develop in the pituitary gland (brain) and parathyroid gland (neck) as well as in the pancreas.

What are the symptoms of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Symptoms may include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting blood (sometimes)
  • Severe esophageal reflux (GERD) symptoms

Signs include ulcers in the stomach and small intestine.

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What are the current treatments for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Drugs called proton pump inhibitors (omeprazole, lansoprazole, and others) are used for treating this problem. These drugs reduce acid production by the stomach. This helps the ulcers in the stomach and small intestine heal. These medicines also relieve abdominal pain and diarrhea.

Surgery to remove a single gastrinoma may be done if the tumors have not spread to other organs. Surgery on the stomach (gastrectomy) to control acid production is rarely needed.

Who are the top Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Local Doctors?
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Highly rated in
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Gastroenterology

Penn Medicine

Perelman Center For Advanced Medicine

3400 Civic Center Blvd 
Philadelphia, PA 19104

David Metz is a Gastroenterologist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Dr. Metz has been practicing medicine for over 40 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome. He is also highly rated in 24 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome, Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, and Indigestion. He is licensed to treat patients in Pennsylvania. Dr. Metz is currently accepting new patients.

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27
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Graduate School Of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University

Fukuoka Sanno Hospital 
Fukuoka, JP 

Tetsuhide Ito is in Fukuoka, Japan. Ito is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome. They are also highly rated in 27 other conditions, according to our data. Their top areas of expertise are Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor, Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome, VIPoma, and Neuroendocrine Tumor.

 
 
 
 
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General Surgery
Surgical Oncology

Stanford Health Care

Gastrointestinal (GI) Cancer Program In Palo Alto

875 Blake Wilbur Dr 
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Jeffrey Norton is a General Surgeon and a Surgical Oncologist in Palo Alto, California. Dr. Norton has been practicing medicine for over 49 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome. He is also highly rated in 48 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome, Pancreatic Cancer, Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1, and Neuroendocrine Tumor. He is licensed to treat patients in California. Dr. Norton is currently accepting new patients.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

The cure rate is low, even when it is found early and the tumor is removed. However, gastrinomas grow slowly. People with this condition may live for many years after the tumor is found. Acid-suppressing medicines work well to control the symptoms.

What are the possible complications of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Complications may include:

  • Failure to locate the tumor during surgery
  • Intestinal bleeding or hole (perforation) from ulcers in the stomach or duodenum
  • Severe diarrhea and weight loss
  • Spread of the tumor to other organs
When should I contact a medical professional for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Contact your health care provider if you have severe abdominal pain that does not go away, especially if it occurs with diarrhea.

Endocrine glands
What are the latest Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Clinical Trials?
Randomized Phase II Study of Everolimus Alone Versus Everolimus Plus Bevacizumab in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors
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Evaluation of the Safety and Sensitivity of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for Imaging NET Patients
What are the Latest Advances for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?
Comparison of clinical characteristics between sporadic gastrinoma and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1-related gastrinoma.
Gastrinoma and Zollinger Ellison syndrome: A roadmap for the management between new and old therapies.
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Successful endoscopic resection of an unusually enlarged and pedunculated type I gastric carcinoid tumour.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date : October 28, 2020
Published By : Michael M. Phillips, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

Öberg K. Neuroendocrine tumors and related disorders. In: Melmed S, Auchus, RJ, Goldfine AB, Koenig RJ, Rosen CJ, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 14th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 45.

Strosberg JR, Al-Toubah T. Neuroendocrine tumors. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 34.