Learn About Ganglioneuroblastoma

What is the definition of Ganglioneuroblastoma?

Ganglioneuroblastoma is an intermediate tumor that arises from nerve tissues. An intermediate tumor is one that is between benign (slow-growing and unlikely to spread) and malignant (fast-growing, aggressive, and likely to spread).

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What are the causes of Ganglioneuroblastoma?

Ganglioneuroblastoma mostly occurs in children ages 2 to 4 years. The tumor affects boys and girls equally. It occurs rarely in adults. Tumors of the nervous system have different degrees of differentiation. This is based on how the tumor cells look under the microscope. It can predict whether or not they are likely to spread.

Benign tumors are less likely to spread. Malignant tumors are aggressive, grow quickly, and often spread. A ganglioneuroma is less malignant in nature. A neuroblastoma (occurring in children over 1 year old) is usually malignant.

A ganglioneuroblastoma may be only in one area or it may be widespread, but it is usually less aggressive than a neuroblastoma. The cause is unknown.

What are the symptoms of Ganglioneuroblastoma?

Most commonly, a lump can be felt in the abdomen with tenderness.

This tumor may also occur at other sites, including:

  • Chest cavity
  • Neck
  • Legs
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What are the current treatments for Ganglioneuroblastoma?

Depending on the type of tumor, treatment can involve surgery, and possibly chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Because these tumors are rare, they should be treated in a specialized center by experts who have experience with them.

Who are the top Ganglioneuroblastoma Local Doctors?
Distinguished
Highly rated in
32
conditions
Hematology Oncology

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Physicians

New York, NY 

Mark Dickson is a Hematologist Oncology doctor in New York, New York. Dr. Dickson has been practicing medicine for over 19 years and is rated as a Distinguished doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Ganglioneuroblastoma. He is also highly rated in 32 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Liposarcoma, Leiomyosarcoma, and Angiosarcoma. He is board certified in Hematology/oncology and Internal Medicine and licensed to treat patients in New York. Dr. Dickson is currently accepting new patients.

Distinguished
Highly rated in
36
conditions
Oncology

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

New York, NY 

Mrinal Gounder is an Oncologist in New York, New York. Dr. Gounder has been practicing medicine for over 18 years and is rated as a Distinguished doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Ganglioneuroblastoma. He is also highly rated in 36 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Epithelioid Sarcoma, Desmoid Tumor, and Liposarcoma. He is board certified in Medical Oncology and licensed to treat patients in Illinois and New York. Dr. Gounder is currently accepting new patients.

 
 
 
 
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Distinguished
Highly rated in
44
conditions
Oncology

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

New York, NY 

Sandra Dangelo is an Oncologist in New York, New York. Dr. Dangelo has been practicing medicine for over 18 years and is rated as a Distinguished doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Ganglioneuroblastoma. She is also highly rated in 44 other conditions, according to our data. Her top areas of expertise are Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Synovial Sarcoma, and Liposarcoma. She is board certified in Medical Oncology and licensed to treat patients in New York. Dr. Dangelo is currently accepting new patients.

What are the support groups for Ganglioneuroblastoma?

Organizations that provide support and additional information:

  • Children's Oncology Group -- www.childrensoncologygroup.org
  • The Neuroblastoma Children's Cancer Society -- neuroblastomachildrenscancersociety.org/
What is the outlook (prognosis) for Ganglioneuroblastoma?

The outlook depends on how far the tumor has spread, and whether some areas of the tumor contain more aggressive cancer cells.

What are the possible complications of Ganglioneuroblastoma?

Complications that may result include:

  • Complications of surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy
  • Spread of the tumor into surrounding areas
When should I contact a medical professional for Ganglioneuroblastoma?

Call your provider if you feel a lump or growth on your child's body. Make sure children receive routine examinations as part of their well-child care.

What are the latest Ganglioneuroblastoma Clinical Trials?
A COG Pilot Study of Intensive Induction Chemotherapy and 131I-MIBG Followed by Myeloablative Busulfan/Melphalan (Bu/Mel) for Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma
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Utility of Gallium-68-DOTA-Octreotate PET/CT in the Characterization of Pediatric Neuroendocrine Tumors
What are the Latest Advances for Ganglioneuroblastoma?
Comparison of Incidence and Outcomes of Neuroblastoma in Children, Adolescents, and Adults in the United States: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program Population Study.
Robotic adrenalectomy in the pediatric population: initial experience case series from a tertiary center.
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Central nervous system ganglioneuroblastoma harboring MYO5A-NTRK3 fusion.
What are our references for Ganglioneuroblastoma?

Harrison DJ, Ater JL. Neuroblastoma. In: Kliegman RM, St Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 525.

Myers JL. Mediastinum. In: Goldblum JR, Lamps LW, McKenney JK, Myers JL, eds. Rosai and Ackerman's Surgical Pathology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 12.