Learn About Arthritis

What is the definition of Arthritis?

Arthritis is inflammation or degeneration of one or more joints. A joint is the area where 2 bones meet. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis.

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What are the alternative names for Arthritis?

Joint inflammation; Joint degeneration

What are the causes of Arthritis?

Arthritis involves the breakdown of structures of the joint, particularly cartilage. Normal cartilage protects a joint and allows it to move smoothly. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on the joint, such as when you walk. Without the normal amount of cartilage, the bones under the cartilage become damaged and rub together. This causes swelling (inflammation), and stiffness.

Osteoarthritis

Other joint structures affected by arthritis include:

  • The synovium
  • The bone next to the joint
  • Ligaments and tendons
  • The linings of the ligaments and tendons (bursae)

Joint inflammation and damage may result from:

  • An autoimmune disease (the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue)
  • Broken bone
  • General "wear and tear" on joints
  • Infection, most often by bacteria or virus
  • Crystals such as uric acid or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate

In most cases, the joint inflammation goes away after the cause goes away or is treated. Sometimes, it does not. When this happens, you have long-term (chronic) arthritis.

Arthritis may occur in people of any age and sex. Osteoarthritis, which is due to non-inflammatory processes and increases with age, is the most common type.

Other, more common types of inflammatory arthritis include:

  • Ankylosing spondylitis
  • Crystal arthritis, gout, calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease
  • Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (in children)
  • Bacterial infections
  • Psoriatic arthritis
  • Reactive arthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (in adults)
  • Scleroderma
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
Osteoarthritis vs. rheumatoid arthritis
What are the symptoms of Arthritis?

Arthritis causes joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement. Symptoms can include:

  • Joint pain
  • Joint swelling
  • Reduced ability to move the joint
  • Redness and warmth of the skin around a joint
  • Joint stiffness, especially in the morning
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What are the current treatments for Arthritis?

The underlying cause often cannot be cured. The goal of treatment is to:

  • Reduce pain and inflammation
  • Improve function
  • Prevent further joint damage

LIFESTYLE CHANGES

Lifestyle changes are the preferred treatment for osteoarthritis and other types of joint swelling. Exercise can help relieve stiffness, reduce pain and fatigue, and improve muscle and bone strength. Your health e team can help you design an exercise program that is best for you.

Exercise programs may include:

  • Low-impact aerobic activity (also called endurance exercise) such as walking
  • Range of motion exercises for flexibility
  • Strength training for muscle tone

Your provider may suggest physical therapy. This might include:

  • Heat or ice.
  • Splints or orthotics to support joints and help improve their position. This is often needed for rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Water therapy.
  • Massage.

Other things you can do include:

  • Get plenty of sleep. Sleeping 8 to 10 hours a night and taking naps during the day can help you recover from a flare-up more quickly, and may even help prevent flare-ups.
  • Avoid staying in one position for too long.
  • Avoid positions or movements that place extra stress on your sore joints.
  • Change your home to make activities easier. For example, install grab bars in the shower, the tub, and near the toilet.
  • Try stress-reducing activities, such as meditation, yoga, or tai chi.
  • Eat a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables, which contain important vitamins and minerals, especially vitamin E.
  • Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as cold-water fish (salmon, mackerel, and herring), flaxseed, rapeseed (canola) oil, soybeans, soybean oil, pumpkin seeds, and walnuts.
  • Avoid smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.
  • Apply capsaicin cream over your painful joints. You may feel improvement after applying the cream for 3 to 7 days.
  • Lose weight, if you are overweight. Weight loss can greatly improve joint pain in the legs and feet.
  • Use a cane to reduce pain from hip, knee, ankle, or foot arthritis.

MEDICINES

Medicines may be prescribed along with lifestyle changes. All medicines have some risks. You should be closely followed by a doctor when taking arthritis medicines, even ones you buy over-the-counter.

Over-the-counter medicines:

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often the first medicine tried to reduce pain. Take up to 3,000 a day (2 arthritis-strength Tylenol every 8 hours). To prevent damage to your liver, do not take more than the recommended dose. Since multiple medicines are available without a prescription that also contain etaminophen, you will need to include them in the 3,000 per day maximum. Also, avoid alcohol when taking etaminophen.
  • Aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that can relieve arthritis pain. However, they can carry risks when used for a long time. Possible side effects include heart attack, stroke, stomach ulcers, bleeding from the digestive tract, and kidney damage.

Depending on the type of arthritis, a number of other medicines may be prescribed:

  • Corticosteroids ("steroids") help reduce inflammation. They may be injected into painful joints or given by mouth.
  • Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are used to treat autoimmune arthritis and SLE
  • Biologics and kinase inhibitor are used for the treatment of autoimmune arthritis. They may be given by injection or by mouth.
  • For gout, certain medicines to lower uric acid levels may be used.

It is very important to take your medicines as directed by your provider. If you are having problems doing so (for example, because of side effects), you should talk to your provider. Also make sure your provider knows about your all the medicines you are taking, including vitamins and supplements bought without a prescription.

SURGERY AND OTHER TREATMENTS

In some cases, surgery may be done if other treatments have not worked and severe damage to a joint occurs.

This may include:

  • Joint replacement, such as a total knee joint replacement
Who are the top Arthritis Local Doctors?
Elite
Highly rated in
5
conditions
Rheumatology

Nebraska Medicine

Internal Medicine Clinic At Durham Outpatient Center

4400 Emile St 
Omaha, NE 68198

Bryant England is a Rheumatologist in Omaha, Nebraska. Dr. England has been practicing medicine for over 10 years and is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Arthritis. He is also highly rated in 5 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Rheumatoid Lung Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Arthritis, and Gout. He is board certified in Rheumatology and Internal Medicine and licensed to treat patients in Nebraska. Dr. England is currently accepting new patients.

Elite
Highly rated in
15
conditions
Rheumatology
Internal Medicine

UAB Medicine

University Of Alabama Health Services Foundation,pc

Birmingham, AL 35233

Jeffrey Curtis is a Rheumatologist and an Internal Medicine doctor in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. Curtis is rated as an Elite doctor by MediFind in the treatment of Arthritis. He is also highly rated in 15 other conditions, according to our data. His top areas of expertise are Rheumatoid Arthritis, Arthritis, Osteoporosis, and Psoriatic Arthritis. He is board certified in Rheumatology and licensed to treat patients in Alabama. Dr. Curtis is currently accepting new patients.

 
 
 
 
Learn about our expert tiers
Learn more
Elite
Highly rated in
18
conditions

European League Against Rheumatism

CH 

Desiree Van Der Heijde is in Switzerland. Van Der Heijde is rated as an Elite expert by MediFind in the treatment of Arthritis. She is also highly rated in 18 other conditions, according to our data. Her top areas of expertise are Axial Spondyloarthritis, Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

What is the outlook (prognosis) for Arthritis?

A few arthritis-related disorders can be completely cured with proper treatment. Yet, many of these disorders become long-term (chronic) health problems but can often be well-controlled. Aggressive forms of some arthritic conditions may have significant effects on mobility and may lead to involvement of other body organs or systems.

What are the possible complications of Arthritis?

Complications of arthritis include:

  • Long-term (chronic) pain
  • Disability
  • Difficulty performing daily activities
When should I contact a medical professional for Arthritis?

Call your provider if:

  • Your joint pain persists beyond 3 days.
  • You have severe unexplained joint pain.
  • The affected joint is significantly swollen.
  • You have a hard time moving the joint.
  • Your skin around the joint is red or hot to the touch.
  • You have a fever or have lost weight unintentionally.
How do I prevent Arthritis?

Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent joint damage. If you have a family history of arthritis, tell your provider, even if you do not have joint pain.

Avoiding excessive, repeated motions may help protect you against osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Arthritis in hip
Rheumatoid arthritis
Knee joint replacement - Series
Hip joint replacement - Series
What are the latest Arthritis Clinical Trials?
The Immunogenicity and Safety of Shingrix Vaccine in Patients With Moderate to Severe Ulcerative Colitis on Tofacitinib
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Post Approval Study 2: Hintermann Series H3 Total Ankle Replacement System
What are the Latest Advances for Arthritis?
Comparison of Clinical and Imaging Outcomes of Different Doses of Adipose-Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction Cell Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis.
Good result for twelve years after bilateral hip and knee arthroplasties for ankylosis with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a case report.
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Dietetic intervention in psoriatic arthritis: the DIETA trial.
Who are the sources who wrote this article ?

Published Date : October 18, 2019
Published By : Gordon A. Starkebaum, MD, MACR, ABIM Board Certified in Rheumatology, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

What are the references for this article ?

Bykerk VP, Crow MK. Approach to the patient with rheumatic disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 241.

Inman RD. The spondyloarthropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 249.

Kraus VB, Vincent TL. Osteoarthritis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 246.

Mcinnes I, O'Dell JR. Rheumatoid arthritis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 248.

Singh JA, Saag KG, Bridges SL Jr, et al. 2015 American College of Rheumatology guideline for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Rheumatol. 2016;68(1):1-26. PMID: 26545940 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26545940/.